February 16

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Enhance your late summer garden with these 16 vibrant blooms that will continue to add color throughout fall

Late summer flowers – 16 best blooms to plant now for color into fall

If you want your garden to continue blooming with color as we head into fall, now is the time to start planning and planting. Late summer is a wonderful season for flowers, with many options available to keep your borders and gardens looking vibrant. In this article, we will explore 16 of the best blooms that you can plant now to enjoy their beauty well into the winter.

One of our favorite late summer flowers is Salvia. With its beautiful blue or purple blooms, Salvia adds a pop of color to any garden. It is also a hardy plant that can withstand the changing weather conditions of late summer and early fall. Another great option is the geranium, which comes in a variety of colors and is known for its long-lasting flowering season. Both Salvia and geraniums are easy to grow and require minimal care.

If you are looking for plants that can attract pollinators to your garden, consider planting borage or anthemis. Borage flowers, with their bright blue color, are a favorite among bees. Anthemis, also known as chamomile, produces beautiful white or yellow blooms that attract butterflies and bees. These plants not only add beauty to your garden but also provide a valuable source of food for pollinators.

In addition to these favorites, there are plenty of other late summer flowers to choose from. Dahlias, with their wide range of colors and shapes, can fill your garden with beauty. Marigolds, with their vibrant orange and yellow blooms, add a touch of sunshine to any space. Parsley, with its delicate white flowers, can be a useful and attractive addition to your herb garden.

Whether you are a seasoned gardener or just starting out, the advice and information from expert gardeners can be invaluable. They can recommend the best plants for your specific climate and soil conditions, as well as provide tips on how to care for them. So, if you want to enjoy a blooming garden through the fall and into winter, it is wise to seek advice from those who have experience.

In conclusion, late summer is a great time to plant flowers that will continue to bloom and bring color to your garden well into the fall and even winter. From Salvia to geraniums, there are plenty of options to choose from. By selecting the right plants and providing them with the necessary support and care, you can enjoy a vibrant and beautiful garden all season long. So start planting now and get ready to enjoy the beauty of these late summer flowers!

Late summer flowers to plant

If you want to prolong the blooming season in your garden, now is the time to start planning and planting late summer flowers. These flowers will add a burst of color and beauty to your garden well into fall.

Geranium

Geraniums are known for their vibrant blooms and easy maintenance. They come in a variety of colors, including pink, red, and white, and can be planted in both containers and border gardens. Geraniums love full sun and well-draining soil.

Anthemis

Anthemis is a wonderful plant that blooms in late summer with bright yellow flowers. It works well as a foil for other plants and is a great addition to any garden. Anthemis can tolerate dry conditions and will attract bees and butterflies to your garden.

Borage

Borage is an easy-to-grow plant that thrives in full sun. It has beautiful blue flowers that add a pop of color to any garden. Borage is also a great plant for attracting pollinators like bees and butterflies.

Dahlias

Dahlias are a must-have for any late summer garden. They come in a wide variety of colors and sizes, and their blooms can last well into fall. Dahlias prefer full sun and well-drained soil. Be sure to provide support for these tall plants.

Marian Boswell

Marian Boswell

Marian Boswell is another great plant for late summer. It has soft pink flowers that bloom in late summer and last through the fall. Marian Boswell is a hardy plant that can tolerate frosts, making it a great choice for colder climates.

Selinum rotundifolia

Selinum rotundifolia, also known as parsley dropwort, is a beautiful flowering plant that blooms in late summer. It has delicate white flowers and attractive finely cut foliage. Selinum rotundifolia prefers full sun or part shade and moist, well-drained soil.

Malope

Malope is another great choice for late summer flowers. It has dark pink flowers that bloom from spring to fall. Malope is an easy-to-grow plant that can tolerate dry conditions and does well in full sun or part shade.

By planting these late summer flowers, you can enjoy a garden that is bursting with color and beauty well into fall. Whether you are a beginner or an expert in gardening, these plants are sure to add vibrancy to your outdoor space. Don’t forget to provide plenty of moisture and support for your plants, and keep deadheading to promote continuous blooming.

1 Canna lily

The Canna lily is a wonderful addition to any garden, especially in late summer when many other plants start to fade. With its tall stalks and large, bold leaves, it adds a touch of drama and elegance to borders and beds.

One of the best things about Canna lilies is that they come in a variety of colors, from vibrant oranges and pinks to more muted yellows and reds. This means you can choose the perfect shade to complement your garden’s color scheme.

Canna lilies love full sun but can also tolerate partial shade. They prefer moist, well-drained soil, so make sure to water them regularly, especially during dry spells. Adding plenty of organic matter to the soil before planting will ensure they have the nutrients they need to thrive.

These plants are known for their long flowering season, which typically starts in late spring and lasts until the first frosts of winter. To keep your Canna lilies blooming for as long as possible, deadhead the spent flowers regularly. This will encourage new blooms to form and ensure a continuous display of color.

Canna lilies are not only beautiful but also attract pollinators to your garden. Bees and butterflies are particularly drawn to their vibrant flowers, making them a useful addition for any wildlife garden.

Expert gardener Roger Boswell suggests planting Canna lilies in containers or at the back of a border to provide a striking backdrop for other plants. They also work well when planted in groups, creating a mass of color that is sure to catch the eye.

If you’re a fan of cut flowers, you’ll be pleased to know that Canna lilies make excellent additions to floral arrangements. Their bold form and vibrant colors add drama and interest to any bouquet.

In summary, the Canna lily is a fantastic choice for any garden. With its long flowering season, vibrant colors, and attractive foliage, it is sure to be a standout plant in your late summer garden. So why wait? Start planting your Canna lilies now and enjoy their beauty through the fall season and beyond.

2 Penstemon

Penstemon is a beautiful flowering plant that belongs to the same family as salvia. It is grown for its attractive tubular flowers that come in various colors, including purple, pink, red, and white. This plant is easy to grow and can be a great addition to your garden.

Penstemons are known for their long blooming season which can last well into the fall. They require full sun and well-drained soil, making them suitable for borders and rock gardens. They can also be grown in containers.

To enjoy the blooms for a longer period, it is important to deadhead the plants regularly. This will encourage more flowers to bloom and keep them looking their best.

One useful variety of penstemon is the Penstemon ‘Gilchrist’ which has dark blue flowers. It can be a great addition to your garden as it attracts bees and butterflies. Another variety is the Penstemon ‘Sour Grapes’ which has purple and white flowers.

Penstemons are generally low maintenance and can tolerate some drought. However, they prefer moderate moisture and may need additional watering in dry periods.

In addition to their beautiful flowers, penstemons have attractive foliage that can serve as a nice foil for other plants in the garden. Some popular companion plants for penstemons include anthemis, tithonia, borage, and malope.

If you are looking for a plant that will bloom late into the season and attract pollinators to your garden, penstemons are a great choice. They are also deer resistant, which can be invaluable if you have a problem with deer in your area.

Penstemons are hardy plants and can withstand frosts and even winter temperatures. However, it is a good idea to provide some protection to keep the plants healthy during harsh winters.

In conclusion, penstemons are a favorite among gardeners for their late-season blooms and attractive foliage. With proper care and deadheading, these plants can provide color and interest to your garden well into the fall. Consider adding penstemons to your garden for a wonderful display of flowers.

For more information and expert advice on growing penstemons and other late summer flowers, sign up for our newsletter. You will receive tips and inspiration directly to your inbox.

3 Rudbeckia fulgida var ‘Goldsturm’

Rudbeckia fulgida var ‘Goldsturm’, commonly known as black-eyed Susan, is a popular late summer flower that will continue to add color to your garden well into fall. This perennial plant features bright yellow flowers with a dark brown center, creating a vibrant contrast in any garden.

Rudbeckia fulgida var ‘Goldsturm’ is a low-maintenance plant that can be planted in full sun or part shade. It prefers well-drained soil and is tolerant of drought, making it a great choice for many gardens. This variety is also deer resistant, which is always useful for gardeners looking to protect their plants.

One of the best features of Rudbeckia fulgida var ‘Goldsturm’ is its long blooming period. The flowers start to bloom in late summer and continue through the fall, providing your garden with a burst of color when many other plants have finished flowering. They also attract butterflies and other pollinators, making your garden a haven for wildlife.

To keep the Rudbeckia fulgida var ‘Goldsturm’ blooming for as long as possible, deadhead the flowers as they fade. This will encourage more blooms and help prolong the flowering period. The dark green foliage of this plant also provides a beautiful backdrop for other flowers in your garden.

If you’re looking for a plant that will add a pop of color to your late summer and fall garden, Rudbeckia fulgida var ‘Goldsturm’ is a wonderful choice. It is easy to grow, low-maintenance, and provides a long-lasting display of vibrant yellow flowers. Whether planted in borders, containers, or wildflower gardens, this versatile perennial is sure to be a favorite.

4 Jacob’s ladder – Polemonium caeruleum

Jacob’s ladder (Polemonium caeruleum) is a beautiful late summer flower that will add a touch of blue to your garden. With its delicate blooms and soft foliage, it is sure to be a favorite in your borders.

This hardy perennial is easy to grow and will thrive in a variety of conditions. It prefers a well-drained soil and will do best in full sun or partial shade. Jacob’s ladder will also tolerate some moisture, making it a great addition to the back of a border or a damp spot in your garden.

These plants start flowering in late spring and continue to bloom through the summer and into fall. The dark blue flowers are a wonderful foil for pink or white flowering plants, such as salvia or geranium. Jacob’s ladder also looks great planted alongside other late summer favorites like dahlias and sunflowers.

If you’re looking to attract pollinators to your garden, Jacob’s ladder is a complete anthemis. Bees and butterflies are drawn to the nectar-rich blooms, making it an invaluable addition to any wildlife-friendly garden.

If you want to extend the flowering season even further, cut back the stems after the first flush of blooms have faded. This will encourage new growth and a second round of flowers later in the season.

For more information on Jacob’s ladder and other late summer flowers, sign up for our newsletter. You’ll receive the latest gardening advice, tips, and plant recommendations straight to your inbox.

5 Pot marigold – calendula officinalis

Pot marigold, also known as calendula, is a beautiful flowering plant that adds a touch of pink to your late summer garden. It is a member of the daisy family and its bright pink flowers are a favorite among gardeners.

The pot marigold is a versatile plant that can be used in a variety of ways in the garden. It can be planted in borders or used to fill empty spaces in the garden. Its soft pink flowers attract bees and butterflies, making it a useful plant for attracting pollinators.

Pot marigold is a hardy plant that can withstand frosts, making it a great choice for those who want to enjoy their garden well into the fall season. It is easy to grow and requires little care, making it a perfect addition to any garden.

Pot marigold prefers well-drained soil and should be planted in a sunny part of the garden. It can be started from seed in the spring or planted as young plants in the garden.

One of the great things about pot marigold is that it is a complete plant. This means that it produces both the flowers and the foliage, making it a wonderful plant for filling empty spaces in the garden.

When planting pot marigold, it is important to keep the soil fertile and well-drained. It is also important to keep the plant watered, especially during dry periods.

One of the things that makes pot marigold so attractive is that it blooms for a long season. The flowers start to appear in late summer and continue to bloom through the fall. This makes pot marigold one of the longest flowering plants in the garden.

Another great thing about pot marigold is that it works well as a back border plant. Its soft pink flowers and dark green foliage create a beautiful foil for other flowering plants.

Pot marigold is a favorite among gardeners for its bright pink flowers and its ability to attract bees and butterflies. It is a hardy plant that can withstand frosts and requires little care. Whether planted in borders or used to fill empty spaces in the garden, pot marigold is a wonderful addition to any garden.

6 Borage

Borage is a wonderful addition to any garden, especially in late summer and into fall. This herbaceous plant is known for its beautiful blue blooms and soft, delicate foliage. They can also come in pink and white varieties if you prefer a different color scheme in your garden.

One of the great things about borage is that they are self-seeding, so once you have them in your garden, you can count on them coming back year after year. They prefer full sun but can also tolerate some light shade. Borage works well as a border plant or as filler in mixed flower beds.

The blooms of borage are not only beautiful, but they also attract bees and other pollinators to your garden. This makes them invaluable for keeping your garden healthy and full of life. The flowers also have a mild cucumber flavor, so they can be used as a garnish or in salads.

Borage is a hardy plant that can withstand frosts, so they will last well into the fall season. You can start borage seeds indoors and then transplant them outdoors after the last frost date, or you can direct sow them in your garden in late spring. Either way, you will have plenty of time to enjoy their blooms.

One thing to keep in mind with borage is that they can spread quite quickly if not deadheaded. Deadheading is the process of removing the spent blooms to encourage more flowering. If you don’t want borage to take over your garden, make sure to deadhead regularly.

Borage is an easy plant to grow and care for. They are not picky about soil conditions and can thrive in almost any type of soil. They also don’t require much water, so you can enjoy their beauty without worrying about constant watering.

If you’re looking to add a pop of color to your garden late in the season, borage is a fantastic choice. With their vibrant blue (or pink or white) blooms and attractive foliage, they will definitely stand out. Plus, their ability to attract pollinators and provide a tasty garnish for your dishes makes them an all-around great addition to any garden.

7 Cosmos

Cosmos bipinnatus is a must-have for any late summer garden. These daisy-like flowers come in a range of colors including pink, white, and dark red, and they add a wonderful burst of color to borders, beds, and containers.

Gardening expert Roger Wilson advises that fall is the perfect time to plant cosmos. They are hardy enough to withstand the winter and will come back strong in the spring. It’s important to keep the soil well-drained and fertile to support their growth.

Cosmos plants grow up to 3 feet tall, so they work well as a border plant or as part of a mixed planting scheme. They also attract bees and butterflies, making them invaluable for pollinators. Deadheading spent blooms will encourage further flowering, giving you a long and colorful season.

There are many varieties of cosmos to choose from, but some popular ones include ‘Sonata’, ‘Purity’, and ‘Rubenza’. Cosmos sulfureus and Cosmos atrosanguineus, also known as chocolate cosmos, are two other options to consider for their unique colors and fragrances.

To add a complete look to your garden, cosmos can be planted alongside other late summer flowers like salvia, tithonia, and borage. Their soft, feathery foliage provides a nice foil for these more structured blooms.

If you’re looking for advice on growing cosmos, Marian Boswell recommends sowing the seeds direct into the soil in late spring or early summer. They don’t like their roots disturbed, so transplanting them can be tricky. Give them plenty of moisture and sunshine, and they will reward you with a stunning display.

In late summer, when many other flowers are starting to fade, cosmos will keep your garden looking colorful and vibrant. With their long-lasting blooms and ability to attract pollinators, they are a must-have for any gardener.

8 Annual mallow – Malope trifida ‘Vulcan’

If you haven’t yet been tempted by the annual mallow ‘Vulcan’ – what are you waiting for? This dark green leafed annual has some of the most challenging seedlings to begin with, so it’s always good to start them off indoors before transferring them outside. When planted in well-drained soil in full sun, they will reward you with beautiful deep red flowers that bloom from July until the first frosts arrive.

Expert tip: Roger at Gardening Know How suggests deadheading the flowers to keep them blooming for the longest time. Deadheading works by removing the spent blooms to encourage the plant to produce more flowers. This simple task will keep your malope flowering until the start of autumn.

One of the reasons why I have found this annual mallow to be invaluable is because it gets very little attention in the gardening world. So, if you are looking for a unique plant that will stand out in your borders, this is definitely one to consider.

Alongside this, the foliage of the malope acts as a strong foil to other plants in the border. It has a soft, almost parsley-like look, and it looks beautiful when planted with other strong green plants such as salvia and anthemis.

For those of you who enjoy a bit of privacy in your garden, the malope will also work well as a backdrop plant. Its tall stems and dark foliage make for a great screen, allowing you to enjoy your garden in peace.

If you’re unsure whether the malope will fare well in your garden, Marian Wilson from The Telegraph recommends growing it in a pot instead. This way, you can control the moisture levels and ensure it gets the right amount of water and sun.

So, whether you choose to grow the malope ‘Vulcan’ in a border or a pot, it is an easy plant to care for and will add a touch of drama to your garden. Make sure to keep an eye on your inbox for the latest gardening tips and information to help you with all your gardening needs.

9 Dahlias

Dahlias are a popular flower choice for late summer and fall gardens. With their stunning blooms and variety of colors, dahlias add a touch of beauty to any landscape.

1. Seed or Tubers

Dahlias can be grown from seed or tubers. Starting from seed is a more affordable option, but it takes longer for the plants to bloom. Tubers, on the other hand, are already established plants that will bloom sooner.

2. Plant Support

Dahlias have a tendency to become top-heavy as they grow, so it’s important to provide them with support. Stakes or cages can be used to keep the plants from falling over.

3. Soil and Sunlight

Dahlias prefer fertile, well-drained soil and full sunlight. They will thrive in a sunny spot in your garden or a container on your patio.

4. Watering and Moisture

Dahlias need regular watering, especially during dry spells. However, be careful not to overwater them, as they can rot in waterlogged soil. Keep the soil evenly moist, but not soggy.

5. Deadheading

To prolong the blooming season, it’s important to deadhead the spent flowers. Removing the faded blooms will encourage the plant to produce more flowers.

6. Attracting Pollinators

Dahlias are a favorite of bees, butterflies, and other pollinators. Planting them in your garden will attract these beneficial insects.

7. Long Blooming Season

Dahlias are known for their long blooming season, which can last from late summer through fall. This makes them a wonderful addition to any garden or flower arrangement.

8. Dahlias in the Kitchen

Did you know that the petals of some dahlia varieties are edible? They can be used to garnish salads or even to make dahlia jelly.

9. Companion Plants

Dahlias pair well with a variety of plants in the garden. Some good companion plants for dahlias include salvia, geranium, tithonia, malope, boswell, selinum rotundifolia, and sunflowers.

Now that you know more about dahlias, why not give them a try in your own garden? These easy-to-grow plants will add color and beauty to your late summer and fall landscape.

10 Anthemis ‘Tetworth’

Anthemis ‘Tetworth’ is a wonderful late summer flower that can fill your gardens with color well into fall. This hardy perennial is easy to grow from seed and provides plenty of blooms for the season.

If you are looking for more information on Anthemis ‘Tetworth,’ Roger Wilson’s expertise is invaluable. He has the latest advice on how to plant and care for these beautiful flowers. You can find further information and useful tips in his gardening newsletter, which you can sign up for and receive directly to your inbox.

One of the best things about Anthemis ‘Tetworth’ is its long flowering season. These flowers can start blooming in spring and last through the longest frosts of fall. They are also known for their ability to withstand winter without any support or deadheading.

When planted in well-drained, fertile soil and given plenty of light, Anthemis ‘Tetworth’ will thrive. They are also quite hardy and can tolerate some moisture, making them perfect for gardens in various climates.

This variety of Anthemis features beautiful pink flowers that stand out in any garden. They are a favorite for many gardeners and provide a lovely contrast to other plants in your flower beds.

If you’re a fan of Anthemis ‘Tetworth,’ you may also enjoy other late summer flowers such as Salvia, Geranium, Malope, and Borage. These flowers will complement each other and create a stunning display in your garden.

So why not add Anthemis ‘Tetworth’ to your list of must-have flowers? They will bring color and beauty to your garden during the late summer and fall seasons. With their easy care requirements and long-lasting blooms, these flowers are a must-have for any garden enthusiast.

Remember to always keep an eye out for the latest expert advice on gardening to ensure your plants thrive. Whether you’re a seasoned gardener or just starting, there is always something new to learn and implement in your own garden.

So go ahead, plant some Anthemis ‘Tetworth’ this season and enjoy their beautiful blooms for months to come!

11 Astrantia

Astrantia is a late summer flowering plant that can withstand frosts, making it a great choice for adding color to your garden well into fall. These plants produce many small, delicate blooms that come in various shades of pink, white, and purple.

Astrantia is an easy plant to grow and can be started from seed or purchased as young plants. They prefer a sunny spot in the garden with fertile, well-drained soil. Astrantia plants also like moisture, so be sure to water them regularly.

One popular variety of Astrantia is ‘Marian Wilson’, which has soft pink flowers that bloom from mid-summer to late fall. Another popular variety is ‘Moulin Rouge’, which has dark maroon flowers. These plants make excellent additions to flower borders and can provide a wonderful foil to other late summer flowers like dahlias and salvia.

Astrantia plants are hardy and will continue to flower even without deadheading. However, if you want to encourage more blooms, it’s best to deadhead them regularly. This involves removing the spent flowers to promote new growth.

If you’re looking for further gardening advice on how to grow Astrantia, there are expert tips and information available. For example, you may want to know how to support the plants as they grow taller or how to keep them free from pests and diseases.

In addition to being a beautiful flowering plant, Astrantia has some useful culinary and medicinal properties. The leaves can be used in salads or as a garnish, and the roots have been used in traditional medicine to treat various ailments.

Overall, Astrantia is a versatile and reliable late summer flower that can add beauty and interest to any garden. Whether you want to enjoy their blooms throughout the season or cut them for floral arrangements, Astrantia is a plant worth considering for your garden.

12 Mexican sunflower – Tithonia rotundifolia ‘Red Torch’

Tithonia rotundifolia, also known as Mexican sunflower, is a stunning addition to any garden. With its vibrant red blooms and tall, sturdy stems, it is sure to be a standout feature in your late summer and fall garden.

The Mexican sunflower is a hardy perennial that can be grown as an annual in cooler climates. It enjoys full sun and well-drained soil, and is a popular choice for attracting bees, butterflies, and other pollinators to the garden.

This plant can grow up to 6 feet tall, making it perfect for the back of a border or to fill in spaces in your garden. The ‘Red Torch’ variety produces masses of bright red flowers that bloom from late summer through fall, providing a burst of color when many other plants are starting to fade.

Tithonia rotundifolia is easy to grow from seed, and will start flowering about 12 weeks after being planted. It is a low-maintenance plant that doesn’t require much attention. Deadheading spent blooms will encourage more flowers to appear, but other than that, it doesn’t need much care.

If you live in an area with mild winters, Mexican sunflower can often survive the season and come back the following spring. In colder climates, it is best to treat it as an annual and replant seeds each year.

One great combination for Mexican sunflower is to plant it with other late summer bloomers, such as dahlias, geraniums, and borage. These plants will provide a beautiful foil for the bright red blooms of the Tithonia rotundifolia.

If you’re looking to attract pollinators and enjoy vibrant, long-lasting color in your garden, the Mexican sunflower is an excellent choice. With its strong blooms, hardy nature, and easy to grow from seed, it is a top pick for late summer and fall gardeners.

13 Agastache ‘Black Adder’

Agastache ‘Black Adder’ is a stunning late summer flower that is sure to add a touch of drama to any garden. With its tall spikes of dark blue-purple flowers, this agastache is a standout in the late-season garden. The flowers are loved by bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds, making them a wonderful addition to any pollinator-friendly garden.

Agastache ‘Black Adder’ is a member of the mint family and is known for its aromatic foliage. The leaves have a licorice-like scent and can be used to make herbal teas or flavor desserts. The plant itself has a bushy habit and reaches a height of around 3 feet. It prefers well-drained soil and full sun, but can tolerate some shade.

One of the best things about Agastache ‘Black Adder’ is that it is a long-blooming perennial. The blooms start in late summer and continue well into the fall season, providing a burst of color when many other plants have finished flowering. The dark blue flowers are a beautiful contrast against the soft pink blooms of Malope trifida or the bright orange blooms of Tithonia rotundifolia.

Agastache ‘Black Adder’ is an easy plant to grow, but there are a few things to keep in mind. It prefers soil that is fertile and well-drained, so be sure to amend the soil with compost before planting. Deadheading the spent blooms will encourage more flowers to form and will also help to keep the plant looking tidy.

Agastache ‘Black Adder’ is hardy in zones 5-9 and can be grown as a perennial in these areas. It can also be grown as an annual in colder climates. If you live in an area with harsh winters, it is best to plant Agastache ‘Black Adder’ in a container and bring it indoors before the first frost. This will help to protect the plant from freezing temperatures and ensure that it comes back year after year.

In conclusion, Agastache ‘Black Adder’ is a fantastic late summer flower that will add beauty and interest to your garden. Its dark blue flowers are a perfect foil to the soft pinks and bright oranges of other late season blooms. With its long bloom season, easy care, and ability to attract pollinators, this agastache is sure to become a favorite in your garden. If you are looking for a plant that will keep your garden colorful well into fall, Agastache ‘Black Adder’ is an excellent choice.

14 Milk parsley – Selinum wallichianum

14 Milk parsley – Selinum wallichianum

If you’re looking for a plant that will provide plenty of color and interest in your garden well into the fall season, then milk parsley (Selinum wallichianum) is a great choice. These hardy plants have beautiful pink blooms that will brighten up any border or flower bed.

Milk parsley is a favorite of expert gardener Roger Wilson. He recommends planting them in well-drained soil in a sunny spot. They will bloom from late summer all the way through to the first frosts, making them an invaluable addition to your garden.

In addition to their stunning pink flowers, milk parsley also has soft, feathery foliage that provides a wonderful foil for other plants. They look particularly attractive when planted next to dark flowering plants like dahlias or geranium ‘Rozanne’.

Milk parsley is a hardy plant that can survive the winter without any additional support. However, if you want to enjoy their blooms for even longer, you can provide some extra care. Cut back the stems to ground level in late autumn and cover the plant with a layer of mulch to protect it from harsh weather conditions. This will help to ensure that the plant comes back stronger and more beautiful next year.

If you’re not sure where to find milk parsley plants, you can always check with your local gardening center or nursery. They may have them in stock, or they can provide you with further information on where to purchase them. You can also sign up for their mailing list to receive the latest gardening advice and tips straight to your inbox.

So if you’re looking for a plant that will fill your garden with beautiful blooms and provide plenty of color throughout the fall season, consider planting milk parsley. They are easy to grow, hardy, and will attract plenty of attention from both humans and pollinators alike.

15 Salvia ‘Blue Monday’

If you are looking for a perennial that will provide long-lasting color in your garden well into fall, then Salvia ‘Blue Monday’ is the perfect choice. This hardy plant is a member of the sage family and is known for its beautiful blue flowers that bloom from late summer through early fall.

Salvia ‘Blue Monday’ prefers full sun and well-drained soil. It is a low-maintenance plant and can tolerate drought conditions, making it ideal for hot and dry areas. The long flowering season of this Salvia makes it a popular choice for adding color and interest to borders, containers, and rock gardens.

One of the main reasons why Salvia ‘Blue Monday’ is so popular among gardeners is its ability to attract pollinators like bees and butterflies. The bright blue flowers act as a magnet, drawing these beneficial insects to your garden.

Salvia ‘Blue Monday’ also works well as a cut flower. Its tall and sturdy stems make it perfect for creating floral arrangements. The flowers can be enjoyed indoors as well as in the garden.

If you would like to grow Salvia ‘Blue Monday’ in your garden, here are some expert tips to help you get started:

  1. Plant Salvia ‘Blue Monday’ in a location that receives at least 6 hours of direct sunlight per day.
  2. Ensure that the soil is well-drained to prevent root rot. Adding organic matter such as compost can improve drainage.
  3. Water the plants regularly, especially during dry periods. However, be careful not to overwater as Salvia ‘Blue Monday’ prefers slightly dry soil.
  4. Deadhead the flowers to encourage continuous blooming. This involves removing the spent flowers by cutting them back to the base.
  5. Salvia ‘Blue Monday’ can be used as a border plant or as a focal point in the garden. It pairs well with other late summer flowers such as Tithonia and Dahlias.
  6. If you want to attract more pollinators to your garden, consider planting Salvia ‘Blue Monday’ alongside other nectar-rich flowers like Anthemis and Geranium.
  7. Provide support to the tall stems of Salvia ‘Blue Monday’ to prevent them from flopping over. This can be done by using stakes or a plant support ring.
  8. Salvia ‘Blue Monday’ is quite hardy and can tolerate light frosts. However, it is always a good idea to provide some winter protection, especially in colder regions.
  9. Propagation of Salvia ‘Blue Monday’ can be done through seed or by taking stem cuttings. Spring is the best time to start new plants.
  10. Salvia ‘Blue Monday’ pairs well with other plants like Selinum wallichianum (Marian Parsley) and pink or white flowering perennials, creating a beautiful color contrast in the garden.

By following these tips, you can enjoy the complete beauty of Salvia ‘Blue Monday’ and keep your garden colorful well into fall. For more expert advice on gardening and plant care, sign up for our newsletter and receive the latest tips and information straight to your inbox.

16 Turkish sage – Phlomis russeliana

Turkish sage, also known as Phlomis russeliana, is a popular late-summer flower that can add color and interest to your garden well into the fall. With its tall, upright stems and unique flower spikes, it brings a touch of drama to any border or garden bed.

This hardy perennial is native to Turkey and can withstand a variety of growing conditions. It prefers full sun but can also tolerate partial shade. Turkish sage thrives in well-drained soil and can tolerate dry spells once established.

The tall flower spikes, which reach up to 3 feet in height, are adorned with clusters of mustard-yellow flowers. These blooms attract pollinators like bees and butterflies, adding even more life to your garden. The silvery-green leaves provide a lovely foil to the bright flowers, creating a striking contrast.

In addition to its ornamental value, Turkish sage also has some practical uses. The dried flowers and foliage can be used in craft projects or to create wreaths and arrangements. The leaves can be used as a herbal tea or as a flavoring for culinary dishes. It is also known for its medicinal properties, such as anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial effects.

When planting Turkish sage, make sure to give it plenty of space to grow, as the plants can spread up to 4 feet wide. They can be planted as an accent plant in the middle or back of a border, or as a mass planting for a dramatic effect. Combine them with other late-summer bloomers like dahlias, tithonia, and salvia for a vibrant and long-lasting display.

Turkish sage is a low-maintenance plant that requires little care. It is generally pest and disease resistant, and drought-tolerant once established. Deadheading spent flowers will encourage more blooms to form and prolong the blooming period.

In regions with harsh winters, it is recommended to protect the plant with a layer of mulch to insulate the roots. In milder climates, Turkish sage may even bloom all winter long.

Whether you have a sunny garden, a cottage garden, or a kitchen garden, Turkish sage is a versatile choice that will bring beauty and interest to your outdoor space. So why not give it a try and enjoy the late-summer blooms and their unique silvery-green foliage?

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What flowers are good for late summer early fall

If you want to add some color and beauty to your garden during the late summer and early fall months, there are many flowering plants that you can choose from. These plants will not only brighten up your outdoor space but will also attract pollinators like bees and butterflies.

1. Dahlias: Dahlias are one of the most popular flowers for late summer and early fall gardens. They come in a wide range of colors and forms, and they bloom from midsummer until the first frosts. Dahlias prefer well-drained soil and full sun.

2. Borage: Borage is a hardy annual plant that produces vibrant blue flowers. It blooms from mid-summer until the first frosts, and it attracts bees and other pollinators. Borage prefers well-drained soil and full sun.

3. Marigolds: Marigolds are easy to grow and they come in various shades of yellow, orange, and red. They bloom from mid-summer until the first frosts and they can be used as border plants or in containers. Marigolds prefer fertile and well-drained soil and full sun.

4. Echinacea: Echinacea, also known as coneflower, is a hardy perennial plant that produces large, daisy-like flowers in shades of pink, purple, and white. They bloom from late summer until fall and they attract butterflies and bees. Echinacea prefers well-drained soil and full sun.

5. Verbena bonariensis: Verbena bonariensis is a tall and slender perennial plant that produces clusters of small, purple flowers. It blooms from midsummer until the first frosts and it attracts butterflies. Verbena bonariensis prefers well-drained soil and full sun.

6. Sedum: Sedum, also known as stonecrop, is a hardy perennial plant that produces clusters of small, star-shaped flowers in shades of pink, red, and white. They bloom from late summer until fall and they are drought-tolerant. Sedum prefers well-drained soil and full sun.

7. Rudbeckia: Rudbeckia, also known as black-eyed Susan, is a hardy perennial plant that produces large, daisy-like flowers in shades of yellow, orange, and red. They bloom from midsummer until the first frosts and they attract butterflies and bees. Rudbeckia prefers well-drained soil and full sun.

8. Helenium: Helenium is a hardy perennial plant that produces clusters of daisy-like flowers in shades of yellow, orange, and red. They bloom from midsummer until the first frosts and they attract butterflies and bees. Helenium prefers well-drained soil and full sun.

9. Salvia: Salvia is a hardy perennial plant with tubular flowers in shades of blue, purple, red, and white. They bloom from midsummer until the first frosts and they attract hummingbirds and butterflies. Salvia prefers well-drained soil and full sun.

10. Asters: Asters are hardy perennials that produce daisy-like flowers in shades of purple, pink, and white. They bloom from late summer until fall and they attract butterflies. Asters prefer well-drained soil and full or partial sun.

11. Zinnias: Zinnias are annual plants that produce colorful, daisy-like flowers in a wide range of colors. They bloom from midsummer until the first frosts and they attract butterflies and bees. Zinnias prefer well-drained soil and full sun.

12. Chrysanthemums: Chrysanthemums are hardy perennial plants that produce a wide range of colorful flowers in late summer and fall. They come in many different shapes and sizes and they are often used in gardens and floral arrangements. Chrysanthemums prefer well-drained soil and full sun.

13. Cosmos: Cosmos are annual plants with feathery foliage and colorful, daisy-like flowers in shades of pink, white, and red. They bloom from midsummer until the first frosts and they attract butterflies. Cosmos prefer well-drained soil and full sun.

14. Japanese Anemones: Japanese Anemones are hardy perennials that produce single or double flowers in shades of pink and white. They bloom from late summer until fall and they prefer well-drained soil and partial shade.

15. Autumn crocus: Autumn crocus is a hardy bulb plant that produces beautiful flowers in shades of purple, pink, and white. They bloom in late summer and early fall and they prefer well-drained soil and full sun.

16. Aster frikartii ‘Mönch’: Aster frikartii ‘Mönch’ is a hardy perennial that produces lavender-blue flowers from midsummer until the first frosts. They attract butterflies and bees and they prefer well-drained soil and full sun.

When choosing late summer and early fall flowers for your garden, always consult with a local expert or nursery for advice on what plants will work best in your area. Consider the soil type, the amount of sun the area receives, and the overall care requirements of the plants you are interested in. With proper planning and care, you can enjoy a beautiful and colorful garden well into the fall.

Which flowers last longest in summer

When it comes to summer flowers that can withstand the heat and keep your garden looking beautiful well into fall, it’s important to choose varieties that are both hardy and long-lasting. Here are some of the best options:

Geranium

Geraniums are known for their long-lasting blooms and ability to thrive in hot weather. They come in a variety of colors, from red and pink to white and purple, and are perfect for filling borders and containers.

Marigold

Marigolds are hardy and easy to grow, making them a popular choice for gardens. With bright orange and yellow flowers, they add a splash of color to any summer landscape.

Salvia

Salvia

Salvia is a versatile plant that comes in a range of colors and sizes. It thrives in full sun and can tolerate heat, making it a great choice for summer gardens.

Sunflower

Sunflowers are a summer favorite and can brighten up any garden. Choose dwarf varieties for smaller spaces or towering sunflowers for a dramatic effect.

Borage

Borage is not only a beautiful flower but also a useful herb. It attracts bees and other pollinators to your garden while adding a pop of blue to your landscape.

Tithonia

Tithonia, also known as the Mexican sunflower, is a tall plant with bright orange-red flowers. It provides a strong vertical element in the garden and can reach heights of up to 6 feet.

Malope

Malope is a hardy annual that blooms late into the summer. Its delicate pink flowers add a soft touch to borders and work well as cut flowers.

Selinum

Selinum

Selinum, also known as the “milk parsley,” produces stunning white umbels of flowers that attract butterflies and other beneficial insects to your garden.

Anthemis

Anthemis, or chamomile, is a wonderful addition to any garden. Its daisy-like flowers bloom all summer long and can be used to make tea or for their calming properties.

When planting these flowers, make sure to choose a sunny spot with well-drained soil. Regular deadheading and watering will help prolong their flowering period. Enjoy the beauty of these long-lasting summer flowers without the hassle of constant maintenance!


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