March 8

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The Ultimate Guide to March Planting: Top Vegetables and Flowers to Plant Now

What to plant in March – the best veg and flowers to plant

March is a time to focus on gardening and preparing for the warmer months ahead. It’s also a great time to start planting hardy vegetables and flowers that can withstand cooler temperatures.

One popular flower to plant in March is calendula, which is well-loved for its bright orange and yellow petals. Calendula can be started indoors and then transplanted outdoors in several weeks. Although they require some space, they can thrive in a sunny and well-drained part of your garden.

Tomatoes are another crop that can be started indoors in March. They will benefit from being started early, as they take several weeks to grow and may not be able to be planted outdoors until after the last frost. Sarah Costa, a farmer from Seraphina Farms, says that planting tomatoes in March allows them to be picked by July.

If you’re looking to start an English cottage garden, March is the perfect time to start planting your favorite annuals. Cornflower (Centaurea cyanus) and corn marigold (Chrysanthemum segetum) are two popular annuals that can be sown directly into the garden. These flowers will add a pop of color to your garden and can be picked for floral arrangements.

When it comes to vegetables, hardy greens like lettuce, spinach, and kale can be directly sown into the garden in March. These plants can tolerate colder temperatures and will benefit from regular watering and a layer of fleece or other protective covering during frosty periods.

For those with limited space or who prefer container gardening, herbs like parsley, thyme, and chives are easy to grow and can be planted in pots or window boxes. These herbs can be picked fresh from your kitchen and added to salads and other dishes.

So whether you’re starting your first garden or looking to try out some new ideas this year, March is the perfect time to get planting. With a little bit of effort, you can have a beautiful and productive garden that will bring joy to your home throughout the spring and summer months.

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What to plant in March – vegetables

What to plant in March – vegetables

March is a great time to start planting vegetables directly into the ground. The colder winter months were a dormant period for many crops, but now is the time to start growing again. According to the latest trends and ideas in gardening, there are plenty of vegetables that can be planted in March and will thrive in the coming months.

One of the vegetables that can be directly sown into the ground in March is lettuce. Lettuce is a hardy plant that can withstand colder temperatures, so it is a perfect vegetable to start growing early in the year. It is also a quick-growing crop, so you will be able to enjoy fresh salads from your own garden in no time.

Another vegetable that can be planted in March is peas. March is the perfect time to start sowing pea seeds directly into the ground. Peas are a cool-season crop that can tolerate colder temperatures. They prefer well-drained soil and will need support as they grow.

Carrots and beets are also great vegetables to plant in March. These root vegetables prefer cooler temperatures and can be directly sown into the ground. Make sure to prepare the soil properly, as carrots and beets need loose and well-drained soil to grow properly.

If you have some space in your garden, you can also start growing tomatoes from seeds in March. Tomatoes are typically grown as transplants, but they can be directly sown into the ground as well. However, it is important to note that tomatoes are sensitive to frost, so if you live in a colder area, it may be better to wait until April or May to start planting them.

When it comes to growing vegetables in March, there are plenty of options. From lettuce and peas to carrots and tomatoes, you can start preparing your garden for a bountiful crop season. Just make sure to follow the specific planting instructions for each vegetable and provide them with the necessary care and attention. Happy gardening!

1 Peas

Peas are a great vegetable to plant in March. They can be sown directly into the ground or started indoors and then transplanted. Sarah Raven, a well-known gardener, adds that peas are hardy and can be sown in rows or even in pots on a sunny windowsill. They require a sunny spot in well-drained soil and should be grown in an area of the garden where they will receive plenty of sunlight.

There are many varieties of peas to choose from, but some popular options include Seraphina, Frosty, and Raven. These varieties have been specifically bred to be cold-hardy and are suitable for early planting. Peas can be grown throughout the year, but they are particularly popular as an early crop since they can be picked within a few weeks of planting.

If you have purchased pea seeds, it is a good idea to soak them in water overnight before planting. This will help soften the seed coat and speed up germination. Peas prefer cooler temperatures, so they can be sown directly into the ground as soon as the soil can be worked. A row of peas can be planted 1 inch deep and seeds should be spaced about 2 inches apart. If the weather is still frosty in your area, you can protect the young seedlings with fleece or a cloche until the danger of frost has passed.

Peas are a versatile vegetable that can be used in many different dishes. They can be added to salads, soups, stir-fries, and even made into a puree. They are also a great addition to a vegetable garden since they are nitrogen-fixing plants, which means they help to improve the soil fertility for future crops.

In terms of care, peas need regular watering, especially during dry spells. They should be watered deeply to encourage strong root development. Peas also benefit from a layer of mulch around the base of the plants to help retain moisture in the soil. Weeding should be done regularly to prevent competition for nutrients.

2 Tomatoes

Tomatoes are one of the most popular crops to grow in the spring. They can be grown outdoors in the garden or in containers on a patio or balcony. Tomatoes require a sunny, well-drained spot and plenty of water to thrive.

1. Early Girl

  • Indeterminate variety
  • Produces medium-sized red tomatoes
  • Ready to be picked in about 62 days
  • Good for cooler climates

2. Beefsteak

  • Indeterminate variety
  • Produces large, juicy tomatoes
  • Ready to be picked in about 80 days
  • Great for slicing and sandwiches

To start tomatoes from seed, sow them indoors about 6-8 weeks before the last frost date. Use a seed starting mix and plant the seeds about ¼ inch deep. Once they have started sprouting, place them in a sunny spot and keep the soil evenly moist.

If you don’t want to start tomatoes from seed, you can also buy seedlings from a nursery or garden center. This will save you time, but keep in mind that the selection may be limited compared to starting from seed.

In colder zones, it is recommended to wait until after the last frost date to plant tomatoes in the ground. You can also protect young plants from cold temperatures by covering them with a cloche or other protective barrier.

Tomatoes can be arranged in rows or grown in containers, depending on the space you have available. They can be grown alongside other vegetables, such as peppers or lettuce, or even with annual flowers like marigold or cornflower. These companion plants can help deter pests and add color to your garden.

Tomatoes should be watered regularly throughout the growing season, especially during dry periods. Ensure they receive at least 1 inch of water per week. You can also mulch around the base of the plants to help retain moisture and suppress weeds.

If you live in a country with a longer growing season, you can start a second batch of tomatoes in June to extend your harvest. Look for varieties that have a shorter growing period and can be harvested before the first frost in your area.

3 Brussels sprouts

In the English garden, Brussels sprouts are a popular vegetable to grow when the latest of the winter season is still lingering. These small cabbage-like vegetables can be sown in March to ensure a plentiful crop for the winter months, taking up plenty of space in the veg garden as they grow.

Brussels sprouts like to be sown in rows, around 45cm apart, and the seeds should be planted about 2.5cm deep. Early March is the perfect time to start planting them, as they will thrive in the spring weather.

Sarah Raven, a renowned home gardener, suggests submitting the seeds in seed trays or small pots and placing them in a sunny windowsill, indoors, for a few weeks until they are ready to be transplanted outdoors.

Another tip is to plant some marigold flowers, such as ‘Seraphina’ calendula officinalis or ‘Black Ball’ cornflower (Centaurea cyanus) nearby, as they will benefit from the early growing period and also help to attract pollinators to your vegetable garden.

Once the Brussels sprouts plants are around 10cm tall, they can be transplanted to their permanent homes outdoors. Make sure to space them around 60cm apart to allow enough room for each plant to grow.

If the weather is still cold, you can use fleece to protect the Brussels sprouts from the chill. This will help to keep them warm and encourage faster growth.

Brussels sprouts are a fantastic addition to winter salads and can add a delicious crunch to any meal. They can be picked from late autumn through the winter months.

So, if you are looking for a vegetable that will bring some life to your garden in the dormant months and provide you with a tasty crop, why not start growing Brussels sprouts in March?

Published: March 2022

Sources: Country Living UK

Fruits to plant in March

March is a great time to start planting fruits in your garden. Whether you have a large backyard or a small balcony, there are plenty of options for you to grow your own delicious fruits. Here are some fruits that you can start planting in March:

Tomatoes

Tomatoes

Tomatoes are loved by many and are a versatile fruit to grow in your garden. They can be used in salads, sandwiches, and even made into sauces. Tomatoes require a sunny spot in your garden and can be grown from seeds or transplants. If you live in a colder zone, you can start planting tomatoes indoors in March and transplant them outside once the weather warms up.

Strawberries

Strawberries

Strawberries are another fruit that is loved by many. They are great for snacking on their own, adding to desserts, or even making jams. Strawberries can be started from seeds or bare-root plants. They need a sunny spot and well-drained soil to grow. Planting strawberries in March will give them enough time to grow and bear fruit by June or July.

Blackberries

Blackberries are hardy and easy to grow fruits. They need a sunny spot and well-drained soil to thrive. Blackberries can be grown from bare-root plants or seeds. Planting them in March will give them enough time to establish their roots and grow strong. You can expect to harvest delicious blackberries from late spring to early summer.

Raspberries

Raspberries are a delicious and nutritious fruit that can be grown in your garden. They require a sunny spot with well-drained soil. Raspberries can be grown from bare-root plants or transplants. Planting them in March will help them establish their roots and grow vigorously. You can expect to enjoy a bountiful harvest of raspberries in the summer.

Blueberries

Blueberries

Blueberries are a popular fruit that is rich in antioxidants. They require acidic soil to grow, so make sure to check the pH levels of your soil before planting. Blueberries can be started from bare-root plants or transplants. Planting them in March will give them enough time to grow and produce delicious berries in the summer.

No matter where you live or the size of your garden, there are plenty of fruits that you can start planting in March. With the right care and attention, you can enjoy a bountiful harvest of delicious and nutritious fruits all season long.

1 Strawberries

Strawberries are a popular choice for home gardens and are often the first fruits that come to mind when thinking of spring planting. They can be grown in containers or in-ground, and they’re a great addition to any garden due to their delicious taste and versatility in cooking.

When it comes to growing strawberries, the focus is on getting the earliest crop possible. For the latest season, it’s best to start strawberries from bare-root plants purchased online or in garden centers. These dormant plants can be transplanted in early spring when the soil can be worked and temperatures start to warm up. Plant them in rows with plenty of space between plants to allow for proper airflow.

Another option is to start strawberries from seed, although this method will require more patience and time. You can find strawberry seeds at your local garden center or online. Start the seeds indoors about 6-8 weeks before the last frost date for your area. Once the seedlings have sprouted and are a few inches tall, they can be transplanted into individual pots or containers.

Strawberries are a perennial plant, meaning they will come back year after year. However, they typically have a shorter lifespan and will produce the best fruit in the first 2-3 years. After that, they may still produce fruit, but the yield will decrease. The plants will benefit from being replaced with new ones.

In colder zones, strawberries may require some protection from frost and freezing temperatures. You can use row covers or mulch to help insulate the plants and keep them warm. It’s important to keep an eye on the weather and cover the plants whenever frosty nights are expected.

Strawberries are also great for growing in containers and hanging baskets, which is a popular trend in gardening. This allows for easier maintenance and harvesting, especially for those with limited space. Strawberry plants have shallow roots, so a container with a depth of at least 6 inches is sufficient. Just make sure the container has drainage holes to prevent waterlogged roots.

There are many different varieties of strawberries to choose from, each with its own flavor and growing requirements. Some popular varieties include ‘Earliglow’, ‘Allstar’, ‘Chandler’, and ‘Seascape’. Do some research to find out which varieties are best suited for your growing zone and the conditions in your area.

In addition to the delicious fruit, strawberries also have attractive flowers and foliage, adding beauty to any garden. To attract pollinators and beneficial insects, consider companion planting strawberries with flowers such as calendula (Calendula officinalis), cornflower (Centaurea cyanus), and borage (Borago officinalis).

When it comes to harvesting, strawberries are ready to be picked when they are fully red and plump. Gently twist or cut the strawberries from the plant, being careful not to damage the stems or surrounding fruit. Freshly picked strawberries are perfect for eating on their own, adding to salads, or being turned into delicious jams and desserts.

So, whether you’re a seasoned gardener or just starting out, strawberries are a great addition to any garden. They’re easy to grow, rewarding to harvest, and provide a bounty of delicious fruit.

2 Raspberries

If you have a deep, well-drained part of your garden or allotment, raspberries can be a great addition to your spring planting. They can also be grown in containers, making them suitable for smaller gardens or even balcony spaces.

Raspberries are hardy and can be planted in late autumn or early spring. Sarah Raven, gardening expert, suggests that March is the perfect time to start planting raspberries in colder areas of the country, whereas in milder regions they can be planted as late as June.

There are two main types of raspberries to choose from: summer-fruiting and autumn-fruiting varieties. Summer-fruiting raspberries produce fruit on canes that grew the previous year, while autumn-fruiting raspberries produce fruit on canes grown that season.

When planting raspberries, it’s important to prepare the soil well in advance. Remove any weeds or grass and dig in plenty of well-rotted manure or compost. Raspberries prefer a slightly acidic soil, so add lime if necessary. Space the canes 45-60cm (18-24in) apart in rows, and dig a hole wide enough for the roots to fit comfortably.

After planting, tie the canes to supports such as a fence or trellis to keep them upright. Water the plants regularly, especially during dry periods, and add a layer of mulch to help retain moisture and suppress weeds.

Raspberries will need to be trained and pruned to keep them tidy and productive. In their first year, cut back the canes to around 25-30cm (10-12in) above ground level. For summer-fruiting raspberries, remove the old canes after they have fruited, while for autumn-fruiting varieties, cut all canes down to ground level in late winter or early spring.

To protect the fruit from birds, cover the plants with netting or fleece. Raspberries are prone to several pests and diseases, including aphids, raspberry beetle, and grey mould. Regularly inspect the plants and take appropriate action if any problems arise.

Raspberries can be picked when they are fully ripe and easily detach from the plant. They are delicious eaten fresh, added to salads, or used in jams, pies, and desserts.

Whether you have a large garden or a small patio, raspberries can thrive and produce a bountiful harvest. With a bit of careful attention and maintenance, you can enjoy the taste of home-grown raspberries for many years to come.

3 Pears

Introduction

Pears are a popular fruit that can be grown in home gardens. They are hardy and can thrive in various climate zones. March is a great time to start planting pears as they benefit from being planted during the dormant season. In this article, we will take a closer look at three different pear varieties that you can consider planting this month.

1. English Pears

English pears, also known as Pyrus communis, are a popular choice for home gardens. They are loved for their sweet and juicy flavor. English pears should be planted in a sunny and well-drained spot in your garden. They can be grown from bare root trees, and it’s recommended to start planting them in March. You can also use a fleece or other protective covering to shield the trees from colder temperatures until they start sprouting.

2. Conference Pears

Conference pears are another popular variety that can be grown at home. They have a long shelf life, making them a great option for storing and enjoying later in the year. Conference pears should be planted in a sunny spot with well-drained soil. They can also be grown from bare root trees, and March is the perfect time to start planting them. Conference pears are hardy and can withstand colder temperatures, making them suitable for various climates.

3. Williams Pears

Williams pears, also known as Bartlett pears, are a well-loved variety that is known for their delicious flavor. They are great for eating fresh, canning, or using in your favorite pear recipes. Williams pears should be planted in a sunny location with well-drained soil. They can be grown from bare root trees, and March is an ideal time to start planting them. It’s important to ensure that they have enough space to grow, as they can reach a good size.

Conclusion

Planting pears in March offers the benefit of allowing them to establish their roots before the growing season starts. English pears, Conference pears, and Williams pears are three great options to consider for your home garden. Remember to choose a sunny spot with well-drained soil and provide any necessary protection from colder temperatures. Enjoy the process of growing your own pears and taste the satisfaction of harvesting fresh, delicious fruit from your own backyard.

What flowers to plant in March

In March, as the winter months come to an end, it’s time to start thinking about what flowers to plant in your garden. With the arrival of spring, dormant gardens come to life, and March is the perfect time to introduce new blooms into your outdoor space.

If you’re looking to add some color and variety to your garden, Sarah Raven, a well-known flower expert, suggests planting cornflowers and marigolds. These flowers can be started from seed in the kitchen and then transplanted into the garden once the risk of frost has passed.

Cornflowers are hardy and can be sown directly into well-drained soil. They will start blooming in late June and continue through the summer months. Marigolds, on the other hand, can be started from seed indoors and then transplanted outside once the weather warms up. They are also hardy and will add a vibrant touch to your flower beds.

For those who love English country gardens, Seraphina’s Sarah Raven’s stunning selection of hardy annuals is a must-see. The seeds can be started in March, and by late June, you will have a garden full of beautiful flowers. The selection includes calendula, cornflower, marigold, and many other varieties that are loved for their colorful blooms.

If you have limited space in your garden, you can still enjoy the benefits of growing flowers. Sarah Raven suggests starting with some hardy annuals, such as cornflowers, marigolds, and calendula, in pots or containers. These flowers can be arranged in rows or clusters to create a colorful display.

For those who live in colder climates, Sarah Raven advises using fleece or a cold frame to protect your plants from frost. This will allow you to start planting flowers earlier in the season and extend the growing period for your blooms.

Some flowers, such as cornflowers and marigolds, can also be grown in vegetable gardens. They can be used as companion plants to attract beneficial insects and add color to your vegetable patches. According to Sarah Raven, planting flowers alongside vegetables can also help to improve the health and productivity of your crops.

Whether you have a large garden or just a few pots on a balcony, there are plenty of flowers that you can start planting in March. By following Sarah Raven’s advice and choosing hardy annuals, you can enjoy beautiful blooms throughout the spring and summer months.

So, get ready to welcome Spring with a garden full of vibrant flowers!

1 Pot marigold – Calendula officinalis

1 Pot marigold - Calendula officinalis

Pot marigold, known scientifically as Calendula officinalis, is a versatile and vibrant flower that can be grown in March. They are popular for their colorful blooms and are easy to grow, making them a great choice for both beginner and experienced gardeners.

These flowers will thrive in full sun and can be planted directly in the ground or in containers. They can be started from seed in early spring and will continue to bloom until the first frost in July. If you have a greenhouse or live in a colder zone, they can also be started indoors and then transplanted outside once the weather warms up.

Pot marigolds are not only beautiful, but they also have a variety of practical uses. The flowers can be used in cooking and add a mild peppery flavor to salads and other dishes. They also have medicinal properties and can be used to make natural remedies for skin irritations and wounds.

When planting pot marigolds, make sure to give them plenty of space to grow, as they can reach heights of up to 2 feet. They can be planted directly in the ground or in containers, and will do well in most soil types. However, they prefer well-drained soil, so make sure to amend heavy clay soils with organic matter.

Pot marigolds can also be used as companion plants in vegetable gardens. They attract beneficial insects such as bees and butterflies, which help to pollinate crops and control pests. Some crops that benefit from being planted near pot marigolds include tomatoes, peas, and beans.

For those looking for unique gardening ideas, pot marigolds can be arranged in attractive combinations with other flowers and plants. Their vibrant colors and long-lasting blooms make them a great addition to any garden or flower bed.

Overall, pot marigolds are a versatile and beautiful flower that can be grown in March. Whether you want to add some color to your garden, attract beneficial insects, or use the flowers in cooking or natural remedies, pot marigolds are a great choice for any home gardener.

2 Cornflower – Centaurea cyanus

Cornflowers, also known as Centaurea cyanus, are beautiful annual flowers that bring a splash of color to any garden. These hardy plants can be grown from seeds directly in the garden, making them a perfect choice for early spring planting.

Cornflowers are known for their vibrant blue flowers, although they can also be found in shades of pink, purple, and white. They have a long flowering season, from late spring until early autumn, and they are loved by bees and butterflies.

One of the great advantages of cornflowers is that they are very easy to grow. They can tolerate a wide range of growing conditions, including both sunny and shady areas. They also have a low water requirement, so you don’t need to worry about watering them too often.

These flowers can be sown directly into the ground in March. Prepare the soil by raking it to a fine tilth and remove any weeds or debris. Scatter the seeds thinly over the prepared bed and lightly cover them with soil. Water gently and keep the soil moist until the seeds germinate. Thinning is not necessary, as cornflowers are quite tolerant of crowding.

Cornflowers can also be grown in pots or containers, which is a great option for those with limited garden space. Just make sure to choose a deep container to allow the roots to grow freely. Keep the soil well-drained and provide the plants with regular water and sunlight.

Once the seeds have been planted, you just have to wait for them to start growing. The first leaves will appear in about a week or two, and the plants should start flowering within a few months.

Cornflowers can be a great addition to any garden, whether you have a large country home or a small urban balcony. Their bright blooms will bring joy and beauty to your living space, and their easy care will ensure that you can enjoy them year after year.

Many gardeners choose to grow cornflowers alongside other spring flowers, such as calendula and English marigold (Calendula officinalis), to create a beautiful and diverse display. These three annuals are a perfect match in terms of their growing needs and appearance.

Cornflowers can also be a great choice for a cut flower garden. Their long, sturdy stems make them perfect for bouquets and floral arrangements. Just remember to pick the flowers early in the day, when they are at their freshest.

So, if you are looking for a beautiful, easy-to-grow flower that will brighten up your garden and attract pollinators, why not give cornflowers a try? They will reward you with a stunning display of color and bring life to your outdoor space.

3 Bishop’s weed – Ammi visnaga

Bishop’s weed, also known as Ammi visnaga, is a versatile and beautiful plant that can be started from seeds in March. It takes about 6-8 weeks for the seeds to germinate and establish before they can be transplanted into your gardens. However, Bishop’s weed is hardy and can also be sown directly in the garden in early spring.

“Bishop’s weed adds a touch of elegance to any garden,” says Seraphina English, the latest gardening expert from Costa Rica. “It is perfect for adding height and texture to salads and cut flower arrangements.”

Bishop’s weed is a part of the carrot family and is native to the Mediterranean region. It produces clusters of small white flowers that resemble the blooms of Queen Anne’s lace or calendula. The plants grow 3-4 feet tall and thrive in full sun and well-drained soil.

To start Bishop’s weed from seeds, Sarah, Costa Rica’s top gardening specialist, recommends sowing them in rows about 12 inches apart and 1/4 inch deep. “Cover the seeds with a light layer of soil and water them well,” she says. “Use a fleece or row cover to protect the young plants from frosty nights if you live in a colder zone.”

Bishop’s weed is a hardy annual that can benefit from a bit of fleece over the winter months. It can be left in the garden to go dormant and will come back to life in early spring. However, if you prefer to grow it as a perennial, you can dig up the plants and pot them to overwinter in a greenhouse or indoors.

Bishop’s weed is a great addition to any garden, adding beauty and height to your flower beds or vegetable gardens. It can be grown alongside other annuals such as cornflower and calendula, or it can stand on its own as a focal point. Regardless of how you choose to grow it, Bishop’s weed is sure to add a touch of elegance to your home.

So, if you’re looking to start some seeds in March, consider Bishop’s weed. It’s a hardy and beautiful plant that will thrive in your garden and provide you with a stunning crop year after year.


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